Sensible definition of wiki vs blog

I wasn’t aware there was such debate over what makes a blog a blog, and a wiki a wiki. But Jordan Frank over at Traction Software makes a sensible distinction, one that I could’ve sworn everybody took for granted?

What is a Blog? A Wiki?

And that, finally, brings me to a baseline definition for both blogs and wikis:
A system for posting, editing, and managing a collection of hypertext pages (generally pertaining to a certain topic or purpose)…
Blog: …displayed as a set of pages in time order…
Wiki: …displayed by page as a set of linked pages…
…and optionally including comments, tags or categories or labels, permalinks, and RSS (or other notification mechanisms) among other features.
Both “blog” and “wiki” style presentations can make pages editable by a single individual or editable by a group (where group can include the general public, people who register, or a selected group). In the enterprise context, more advanced version control, audit trail, display flexibility, search, permission controls, and IT integration hooks may also be present.

He goes into the history of various debates over the terms, which I found enlightening. Mainly because they show that people invest the idea of “blog” or “wiki” with lots of philosophical and political baggage and emotional resonance.

Evidently some folks believed “A BLOG is what it is because it allows comments and conversation!” But that seems silly to me, since to some degree the grandfather of blogs was “Robot Wisdom” where a slightly obsessive polymath simply posted quick links (a “log” — like a ship captain’s log — of his travels on the web, hence “web log”) and little one-line comments on them. I’m happy to see that, as of this moment, he’s still at it. And it doesn’t have any comment capability whatsoever.

In fact, it’s very lean on opinion or exposition of any kind! But it is, in essence, what Jordan defines above — a system for posting a collection of pages (or, I would actually say, ‘entries’) in time order. Quintessential “weblogness.”

Now, I suppose some could argue that somewhere between “weblog” and the truncated nickname “blog” things shift, and blogs are properly understood as something more discursive? But I don’t think so. I think the DNA of a blog means it’s essentially a series of posts giving snapshots of what is on the mind of the blog’s writer, both posted and presented in chronological order. That might be a ‘collective’ writer — a group blog. But it’s what it is, nonetheless.

But that doesn’t mean the emotional attachment, philosophical significance and political impact aren’t just as important — they’re just not part of the definition. :-)

[Edited to add: while it's true that a wiki & blog *can* both make pages editable by one author or a group, in *practice* a blog tends to be about individual voices writing "posts" identified with author bylines, while a wiki tends to be about multiple authors writing each "article" through aggregated effort. Blogs & wikis started with these uses in their DNA, and the vast majority of them anti bullying video this pattern. Fore example, most blog platforms display the name of a post's author by default, while most wikis don't bother displaying author names on articles, because there's an assumption the articles will be written & refined over time by multiple users.]

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  • http://robotwisdom2.blogspot.com Jorn Barger

    My original approach was to post my longer thoughts to Usenet and link them in the blog via DejaNews (now GoogleGroups). Blogger.com really only likes the long posts– trying to squeeze a linkblog in, too, is very awkward (eg their rss doesn’t reposition my linkpage to the top even if I re-date it). I can’t remember if there was journaling software like LiveJournal in 1997, but blogging software has never really been optimised for anything but journaling. Del.icio.us is actually better for linkblogs but I haven’t seen anybody promoting it for this.